Michigan State University
Michigan State University
Romance and Classical Studies
Scott Boehm
Home > People > Faculty > Scott Boehm


Scott Boehm

Degree: Ph.D., University of California, San Diego

Position: Assistant Professor of Spanish

Research Interests: 20th-21st Century Spanish Literature, Cinema and Culture; Spanish Civil War; Spanish Horror Film; Film Studies; Cultural Studies; Memory Studies; Trauma Studies; Psychoanalysis; Social Justice

Campus Address: B-452 Wells Hall

Phone: (517) 884-6307

Email: sboehm@msu.edu

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Scott Boehm is Assistant Professor of Spanish in the Department of Romance and Classical Studies and the Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities Program at Michigan State University.  His research focuses on the multiple legacies of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), the Francoist dictatorship (1939-1975) and the Transition (1975-1982) as they appear both in cultural production and cultural politics in contemporary Spain.  He is currently working on a book manuscript about Spanish horror film that interrogates sinister relationships between state terrorism, cultural trauma and impunity as they manifest in allegories of power and loss haunted by representations of gender, sexuality and childhood.

As a Researcher for the Spanish Civil War Memory Project (UC San Diego)—the world’s largest archive of video testimonies of the war and the state repression that followed—Dr. Boehm conducted over fifty interviews with ex-political prisoners and family members of those forcibly disappeared by Spanish fascists.  As a Fellow of the Human Rights Center (UC Berkeley) he worked with the Association for the Recovery of Historical Memory, assisting with mass grave exhumations and archival research in Spain’s Boletín Oficial del Estado.

Publications:

“Reading Madrid as Crime Fiction, or Public Memories of an ‘Olympic Capital of Impunity’” (forthcoming)

“Specters of Genocide: Mass Graves, Horror Film and Impunity in Post-Dictatorship Spain” in The Ethics of Remembering and the Consequences of Forgetting: Essays on Trauma, History and Memory, Michael O’Loughlin (Ed.), Roman & Littlefield, 2014.

“Privatizing Public Memory: The Price of Patriotic Philanthropy and the Post-9/11 Politics of Display,” American Quarterly, 58:4 (2006): 1147-1166.